Sources: MLBPA to make counteroffer Monday

MLB

Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association plan to meet Monday, when the union is expected to present a counteroffer to the league’s proposal last week, sources told ESPN’s Jeff Passan.

The players’ association asked Major League Baseball on Thursday to schedule the negotiating session, which is to take place in-person, sources said.

This would be the second meeting between the sides since MLB locked out players on Dec. 2. The meeting would come 11 days after clubs gave the union a proposal.

News of the meeting was first reported by The Associated Press.

There is dwindling time to reach an agreement in time for spring training to start as scheduled on Feb. 16.

The scheduled March 31 opening day is also increasingly threatened, given the need for players to report, go through COVID-19 protocols and have at least three weeks of workouts that include a minimal number of exhibition games.

Players don’t receive paychecks until the regular season, and owners get only a small percentage of their revenue during the offseason. Those factors create negotiations until mid-to-late February, when significant economic losses become more imminent.

When owners made their new proposal during a video meeting on Jan. 13, players reacted coolly and said they would contact MLB when they were ready to respond.

Baseball’s ninth work stoppage, its first since 1995, started Dec. 2 following the expiration of a five-year labor contract.

Unhappy with a 4% drop in payrolls to 2015 levels, players have asked for significant change that includes more liberalized free agency and salary arbitration eligibility.

Six seasons of major league service have been required for free agency since 1976. Salary arbitration eligibility since 2013 has been three seasons plus the top 22% by service time of players with at least two years but less than three years.

MLB proposed to replace the “super two” arbitration group with additional spending for the entire two-plus class based on performance.

Players also want to reduce revenue sharing, which would take money away from smaller-market teams and allow large-market clubs to retain a higher percentage of cash — presumably to be spent on salaries.

The luxury tax threshold was $210 million in 2021, and MLB proposed raising the threshold to $214 million. Players have asked to raise the threshold to $245 million and to eliminate non-tax penalties.

Teams also want to expand from 10 postseason teams to 14, and players have offered 12.

Both sides have proposed a draft lottery aimed to spur competition on the field but differ on how many teams to include.

In their latest proposal, teams offered to address the union’s concern over club service-time manipulation by allowing a team to gain an additional draft pick for an accomplishment by a player not yet eligible for arbitration, such as a high finish in award voting.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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